Baker & Slider's Criminal Legal Guide for
University of Georgia Students

Welcome to Athens, Georgia and UGA to all new and returning students. The firm of Baker & Slider wanted to give some general information concerning common crimes that UGA students seem to face and the criminal justice system in Athens, Georgia. The most common crimes that university students seem to face in Athens are Underage Possession of Alcohol (UPA/MIP); Possession of a False Identification Document (Fake ID); Driving Under the Influence (DUI) and Drug Possession, including marijuana and prescription medications.

Law enforcement officers are very visible and present downtown Athens and have numerous contacts with students at night that could lead to the charges mentioned above. These interactions start with things that draw the attention of police officers, such as being turned away at a bar because of a fake id, open container violations, urinating in public, or some kind of loud verbal or physical altercation on the streets or sidewalks. Additionally traffic stops that result in charges occur throughout the county, and increasingly are being made as a result of the new cell hands free law. Once a police officer decides to stop and charge or arrest somebody, the person charged will have to appear in the Municipal Court of Athens, the State Court of Athens-Clarke County, or the Superior Court of Athens-Clarke County, depending on the severity of the charges.
Prosecutors in Athens aggressively prosecute drug and alcohol offenses, and are willing to present these cases before a jury. The charges that students face can result in, among other things, jail time, probation, and loss of a driver's license. Beyond the consequences that students face in the criminal justice system, they can face consequences with UGA, including academic probation and expulsion.

If you find yourself facing criminal charges and have questions about what to do next, contact the firm of Baker & Slider at 706-208-1514 for a free consultation. It is important to know your rights and your options, as criminal charges can have a long lasting impact.

Hot coffee or Hot Air? The truth behind the McDonald's coffee case

It is ironic that one of the most famous personal injury cases in American jurisprudence is also the most misunderstood. When you think of the McDonald's coffee case, which of the following is true and which is false?

  • The Plaintiff almost died from her burns T/F
  • McDonalds knew the temperature of their coffee
  • would cause third degree burns in 3 secondsT/F
  • The Plaintiff was a passenger rather than a driverT/F
  • The Plaintiff received far less than a million dollarsT/F


To see how you scored, watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCkL9UlmCOE

The falsities reported about the coffee case in 1992 are mind boggling; but the ruse that followed by then big tobacco employee, Karl Rove (yes, that Karl Rove), is even harder to believe. Rove saw an opportunity to fend off liability by matching up the coffee case with terms like "frivolous lawsuit" and "tort reform." The excellent documentary "Hot Coffee", which streams free on Amazon prime, is a fascinating account of how an entire society was lied to so that insurance companies and big corporate could increase their profits by reducing other "frivolous" lawsuits.
At Baker & Slider, we did not achieve the highest possible ethical rating from Martindale-Hubbell by filing "frivolous" lawsuits. We adhere to a core philosophy that the justice system is a gift, not a game. If a potential client asks us to pursue a claim that we perceive without merit, we reject it. We choose our personal injury cases carefully to ensure that we represent client who have legitimate injuries caused by no fault of their own.
There is no better feeling than representing a client who needs our help; and, doing our very best to win their case. Personal injury cases are a great example of that because the law clearly requires an at-fault party to compensate injuries to another. When an insurance company refuses to pay what is reasonable and fair in such a situation, hoping it can spin the situation by using terms like "frivolous", that is where we come in. We do not represent Clients with unreasonable expectations of a windfall; and, even if we did, despite the common misconception to the contrary, they would never receive it just because we asked.
At Baker & Slider, we fight for Clients who have real cases in an effort to achieve real justice. Take that Karl Rove!

WHAT IS "UM" CAR INSURANCE? WHY SHOULD I CARE

Car wrecks are scary as hell even if you are not badly hurt, especially when the other driver caused the wreck for no good reason.   Suffering a horrible injury that dramatically affects every aspect of your life takes it to another level by affecting your school, marriage, parenting, work, and overall quality of life.  In that situation, the last thing you want to make matters even worse is having nothing available to pay for costs of medical treatment that is uncovered by health insurance.  Whether you have outstanding health insurance or none at all, it is not fair for you to have to come out of pocket for co-pays, deductibles, etc. for something that was not your fault.  This post on “UM coverage” is the first in a series that I am writing to arm Georgians with information to better their lives by knowing the law before they need, rather than after it is too late.  I hope you learn something in the series; and, that you will contact me for additional information on any particular topic if you need it. 

               I have represented people who were hurt in car wrecks caused by other drivers for over 17 years.  During that time, one consistent thing that has come up is that my Clients almost always wish that they had purchased 1) more UM coverage and 2) the right kind of UM coverage.  The problem is that most folks have no idea what that even means until it is too late.  If even one person reads this and obtains appropriate UM coverage that “saves their bacon” later, writing this post will be well worth it.  

               Georgia’s minimum coverage rule is, well, extremely “minimum”

               When the other driver is at fault, their liability insurer is on the hook for the limits of their policy.  The problem is…in Georgia, you can legally drive with only $25,000 in liability coverage.  www.oci.ga.gov/ConsumerService/AutoInsurance.aspx

            Georgia consumers must have automobile liability insurance for at least the minimum limits required by law to drive on the Georgia public roads and highways. The minimum limits of liability required under Georgia law are Bodily injury Liability of $25,000 per person, $50,000 per occurrence and Property Damage liability of $25,000 per         occurrence. Liability insurance is insurance that pays damages to others, on behalf of an insured, for injury to or damaged property of others, up to the policy limit, which an   insured may have caused by his negligence or may protect him against claims made against him by someone who alleges he was at-fault. 

               Is there a problem with this?   Ask one of my Clients badly injured in a wreck someone else caused.  When you do, they will say that $25,000 is not nearly enough to pay for treatment for many injuries; or, so much as a couple of nights in the hospital.  Pain and suffering?  Lost wages from time off work?  Not a chance! 

               While opinions may vary as to whether Georgia should have raised its mandatory liability limits long ago, at least at the present time, it is what it is, as they say.  If you disagree with the rule of law, contact your local Representative or Senator.   The other thing you can do is make sure you are not left saddled with a lifetime of debt for something that was not your fault.  One way to accomplish this is by seriously considering purchasing the right kind of UM auto coverage.

“UM” means “uninsured” or “underinsured”

               One thing my Clients who have purchased UM coverage definitely have shown a lack of understanding about is what kind of UM coverage they have.  For some reason, my Clients never seem to come to me with an understanding that they were sold one of two very different kinds of UM coverage by their insurance agent; and, that the differences were never explained to them.   This blows my mind, because I see the impact on my Clients’ lives by this seemingly mundane “check the box” decision so often.  Let’s break down the differences.

               The first kind of UM coverage is what I have heard at least one insurance agent refer to as “regular UM.”  The term I use for this coverage is “offset UM.”  It is less expensive and often what is chosen for UM coverage by my Clients,unfortunately, who lack the knowledge that there is something offering significantly greater protection for just a bit more money.   The “offset” means that if you purchase $25,000 of UM coverage, it is offset by the at-fault driver’s liability policy.  Since the at-fault driver will have at least $25,000 of insurance, that means that purchasing such a UM policy is completely worthless.   The only exceptions to that are two things that are extremely unlikely:  1) the at-fault driver is a “hit and run” who is never captured; or, 2) the at-fault driver is driving a vehicle that lacks any liability insurance, whatsoever. 

               The second UM variety is what is commonly referred to as “excess” or “add on” coverage, as in excess or supplemental to any liability policies.  Using the same scenario as above, purchasing “excess”  coverage would mean that there is no offset; and, once the $25,000 liability policy of the at-fault driver is used up, there is another $25,000 payable for medical bills, pain and suffering, or lost wages.  In other words, if just your medical bills alone are $50,000, checking the “excess” box when choosing insurance could mean the difference between incurring $25,000 in debt versus $0 debt at the conclusion of your case.

Conclusion

               Ask your insurance agent UM coverage.  For instance, ask them how much choosing “excess UM” costs versus “offset UM.”  From there, after you know the facts, make the best financial decision for you and your Family.  That way, if you ever find yourself seriously injured at the fault of someone else, your total available insurance coverage does not necessarily have to be dictated by the choice of the at-fault driver.  This is especially important when that same driver opted to get the cheapest coverage they could find just because the State allowed them to do it.    

Baker & Slider's Criminal Legal Guide for University of Georgia Students

   Welcome to Athens, Georgia and UGA to all new and returning students. The firm of Baker & Slider wanted to give some general information concerning common crimes that UGA students seem to face and the criminal justice system in Athens, Georgia. The most common crimes that university students seem to face in Athens are Underage Possession of Alcohol (UPA/MIP); Possession of a False Identification Document (Fake ID); Driving Under the Influence (DUI) and Drug Possession, including marijuana and prescription medications.

     Law enforcement officers are very visible and present downtown Athens and have numerous contacts with students at night that could lead to the charges mentioned above. These interactions start with things that draw the attention of police officers, such as being turned away at a bar because of a fake id, open container violations, urinating in public, or some kind of loud verbal or physical altercation on the streets or sidewalks. Additionally traffic stops that result in charges occur throughout the county, and increasingly are being made as a result of the new cell hands free law. Once a police officer decides to stop and charge or arrest somebody, the person charged will have to appear in the Municipal Court of Athens, the State Court of Athens-Clarke County, or the Superior Court of Athens-Clarke County, depending on the severity of the charges.


    Prosecutors in Athens aggressively prosecute drug and alcohol offenses, and are willing to present these cases before a jury. The charges that students face can result in, among other things, jail time, probation, and loss of a driver's license. Beyond the consequences that students face in the criminal justice system, they can face consequences with UGA, including academic probation and expulsion.


    If you find yourself facing criminal charges and have questions about what to do next, contact the firm of Baker & Slider at 706-208-1514 for a free consultation. It is important to know your rights and your options, as criminal charges can have a long lasting impact.